Caldera at Kilauea

Fire Makes Earth on Hawai’i

Caldera at Kilauea
Caldera at Kilauea

In the Chinese Five Element System fire makes earth.  There is nowhere that this is more evident than on the island of Hawai’i (Big Island) in Hawai’i  Volcanoes National Park.   The power of the fire in the earth is very apparent.

Steam Vents at Kilauea
Steam Vents at Kilauea

Steam is visible everywhere.  At night the glow of fire from the caldera at Kilauea is visible from many points around the crater and frequently lava is visible flowing down the mountain to the sea.

As we drove towards the water in the daylight the stark landscape of  lava spread out before us as far as the eye could see. This is where fire creates earth.

Lava
Lava

Regrowth is visible in the crevices.  Tiny plants grab whatever nutrients they can along with the abundant water, and grow.

Plant in Lava Crevice
Plant in Lava Crevice

Some places that were missed  by the lava flow are verdant with plants.  It rains a lot so the recovery is quick – in geologic time.  The earth begins to return to what we might think of as normal.  Almost.  Steam appears as the rain seeps into the hot ground and the fire in the earth is evident again.

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17 thoughts on “Fire Makes Earth on Hawai’i

    1. It’s a wonderful experience. If you stay in Volcano get a place with heat. It was pretty cold for this Kihei girl.

  1. We were on the Big Island years ago. Would love to go again to see the cause of all this vog lately. Lava is so amazing to see in person, the lava rock formations, the smell of sulphur in the air… ack… 🙂 Love your snap-shots. Nice article.

    1. But we get the VOG. It is kind of scary. There are houses rebuilt on recent lava and they look really odd. I’m not sure I would have rebuilt if it had been my house.

    1. Thanks! I must have taken 50 or more pictures of lava and they were all quite boring. I deleted more pictures than usual on this trip.

  2. I’ve never been close to a volcano although I lived in Hilo for a few years. I have asthma, not serious but still it’s not advised. I love your photos Eli and how you related the volcano to the Chinese element system. You are always thinking about more than what is right in front of you, wise lady.

    1. Thanks. Steve has asthma and he seems to weaze more here than he did there. I think there are areas you need to stay away from but most places are pretty clear.

  3. We’ve to the Big Island, but I’m kicking myself for not having visited the park. Thanks for sharing this and inspiring our next trip. ALOHA!

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